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May 15

Feb 28

Have a browse of the site’s front page and you’ll see a glittering array of fashion items, wedding dresses, dream home furnishings and jewellery. Colour, shape, craft, design and imagery, all stylishly laid out in one place. There’s no doubt that Pinterest’s unique selling point is that it is visual, so for a sector that buys and sells in visual experiences, the social network appears a perfect fit for arts organizations and venues.

Already ahead of the curve, a handful of galleries and museums have picked up on Pinteret’s most obvious artistic use: creating virtual, shareable versions of exhibitions and collections. Audiences can preview pieces of art and museum items online and share their favourite pieces by re-pinning them onto their own boards. It’s something Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery have done to a good effect.

[Excerpt, click on the link to read the rest of this post.]

From: Guardian Professional / Culture professionals network — What Pinterest means for the arts

By Matthew Caines

(via creativesage)

(via creativesage)


Feb 17
“In an ironic way, Long says, this frees many people to be more public about who they really are and who they want to be, because it’s less focused on the kind of personal content that sets off privacy and security alarms. “Pinterest is a place where we can demonstrate: ‘If it weren’t for all those mundane things that I do that I post on Facebook, this is what I would be doing and consuming. Here is my real self,’” he explains.” Why Pinterest Is So Addictive (via fastcompany)

(via fastcompany)


Feb 16
shortformblog:

onaissues:

“Twitter Inc. has acknowledged that after mobile users tap the “Find friends” feature on its smartphone app, the company downloads users’ entire address book, including names, email addresses and phone numbers, and keeps the data on its servers for 18 months.
The company also said it plans to update its apps to clarify that user contacts are being transmitted and stored. The company’s current privacy policy does not explicitly disclose that Twitter downloads and stores user address books.”
Read more on the LA Times: Twitter stores full iPhone contact list for 18 months, after scan.

Sounds like Path was only the tip of the iceberg on this whole privacy thing.

shortformblog:

onaissues:

“Twitter Inc. has acknowledged that after mobile users tap the “Find friends” feature on its smartphone app, the company downloads users’ entire address book, including names, email addresses and phone numbers, and keeps the data on its servers for 18 months.

The company also said it plans to update its apps to clarify that user contacts are being transmitted and stored. The company’s current privacy policy does not explicitly disclose that Twitter downloads and stores user address books.”

Read more on the LA Times: Twitter stores full iPhone contact list for 18 months, after scan.

Sounds like Path was only the tip of the iceberg on this whole privacy thing.

(via npr)


Jan 26
bigboxcar:

Screengrab above. “Embedded” tweet below:

Holy! I didn’t know Twitter recently made embedding tweets on blogs posts SUPER EASY NOW! Very nice: play-this.org/2011/12/13/emb…
— Karl Pearson-Cater (@bigboxcar) January 25, 2012
Very nice! Links are clickable and the author name is clickable. You can even follow the user from this embedded tweet. (Kinda overkill, but that’s okay.)
And it’s SUPER easy! See the text “Embed this Tweet” on the screenshot above? That’s from the pernalink for the tweet. Click on that link and you get the code.
I learned about it when I found this post — there are *much* clearer instructions on how to do this: “Embedding Tweets is Easier Than Ever With Latest Twitter Update”.
Note: The Tumblr Dashboard destroys the embedded tweet styles (of  course), so you’ll need to view this post on my blog to see how it looks
I did a little experimenting and it looks like if you are embedding a @reply then the original tweet shows up above it. Brilliant.

bigboxcar:

Screengrab above. “Embedded” tweet below:

Very nice! Links are clickable and the author name is clickable. You can even follow the user from this embedded tweet. (Kinda overkill, but that’s okay.)

And it’s SUPER easy! See the text “Embed this Tweet” on the screenshot above? That’s from the pernalink for the tweet. Click on that link and you get the code.

I learned about it when I found this post — there are *much* clearer instructions on how to do this: “Embedding Tweets is Easier Than Ever With Latest Twitter Update”.

Note: The Tumblr Dashboard destroys the embedded tweet styles (of course), so you’ll need to view this post on my blog to see how it looks

I did a little experimenting and it looks like if you are embedding a @reply then the original tweet shows up above it. Brilliant.


Jan 12
thedailywhat:

Bad Business of the Day: A woman who penned an unflattering Yelp review of the Atlanta-based BBQ joint Boners received her own negative evaluation on the establishment’s Facebook page.
A message posted above the female patron’s photo claims she left her server no tip on a $40 meal, and invites other customers to harass her with expletives.
The woman in question told The Huffington Post that, conterary to Boners’ claim, she did tip — almost $10. “I did leave a tip and my review was not scathing by any means,” she said. “The response from Boners BBQ has just been astonishing to me, especially since it came from the owner of the business.”
The restaurant eventually realized that attacking customers on Facebook for bad reviews doesn’t really help their image.
“Trying to stir up the pot, we lost out lid and spilled the beans,” Boners wrote in a follow-up post. “Would like to apologize for any inappropriateness on our part.”
Unfortunately for Boners, the six new single-star reviews that have popped up on Yelp since the brouhaha began suggest they’re not quite done apologizing.
[adfreak.]

thedailywhat:

Bad Business of the Day: A woman who penned an unflattering Yelp review of the Atlanta-based BBQ joint Boners received her own negative evaluation on the establishment’s Facebook page.

A message posted above the female patron’s photo claims she left her server no tip on a $40 meal, and invites other customers to harass her with expletives.

The woman in question told The Huffington Post that, conterary to Boners’ claim, she did tip — almost $10. “I did leave a tip and my review was not scathing by any means,” she said. “The response from Boners BBQ has just been astonishing to me, especially since it came from the owner of the business.”

The restaurant eventually realized that attacking customers on Facebook for bad reviews doesn’t really help their image.

“Trying to stir up the pot, we lost out lid and spilled the beans,” Boners wrote in a follow-up post. “Would like to apologize for any inappropriateness on our part.”

Unfortunately for Boners, the six new single-star reviews that have popped up on Yelp since the brouhaha began suggest they’re not quite done apologizing.

[adfreak.]

(Source: thedailywhat)


Nov 9

Nov 3
infoneer-pulse:

Google Kills Its Other Plus, and How to Bring It Back

On Wednesday, Google retired a longer-standing “plus”: the + operator, a standard bit of syntax used to force words and phrases to appear in search results. The operator was part of Google since its launch in 1997 and built into every search engine since.
Unlike their other recent closures, the removal of + was made without any public announcement. It could only be found by doing a search, which advised the user to double-quote the string from now on, making “searches” look like “awkward” “Zagat” “reviews.”
Google wouldn’t disclose exactly why they phased it out, though it seems obvious that they’re paving the way for Google+ profile searches. When Google+ launched, instead of adopting Twitter’s @reply syntax, they coined their own format for mentioning people — adding a plus to the beginning of a name — triggering the future conflict with the + operator.
The fate of the “+” symbol was clear: protect a 12-year-old convention loved by power users, or bring Google+ profile searching to the mainstream? It was doomed from the start.

» via Wired

infoneer-pulse:

Google Kills Its Other Plus, and How to Bring It Back

On Wednesday, Google retired a longer-standing “plus”: the + operator, a standard bit of syntax used to force words and phrases to appear in search results. The operator was part of Google since its launch in 1997 and built into every search engine since.

Unlike their other recent closures, the removal of + was made without any public announcement. It could only be found by doing a search, which advised the user to double-quote the string from now on, making “searches” look like “awkward” “Zagat” “reviews.”

Google wouldn’t disclose exactly why they phased it out, though it seems obvious that they’re paving the way for Google+ profile searches. When Google+ launched, instead of adopting Twitter’s @reply syntax, they coined their own format for mentioning people — adding a plus to the beginning of a name — triggering the future conflict with the + operator.

The fate of the “+” symbol was clear: protect a 12-year-old convention loved by power users, or bring Google+ profile searching to the mainstream? It was doomed from the start.

» via Wired




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